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The easing of travel restrictions in each state and territory and how this impacts work for Locum GPs

11 Jun 14:00 by the Medical Recruitment team

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As the spread of coronavirus seems to be curbed in most states of Australia, the restrictions set by Australia’s federal, state and territory governments are starting to ease, including travel. We understand for some, especially our Locum GPs, the travel restrictions have had a significant impact. So, what does this mean for you?  The majority of the states are now allowing travel within the state with no restrictions, and interstate travellers to be allowed across the borders with some exceptions.  This is significant to a lot of GP clinics in rural areas needing Locum GPs, and allows for an increase in availability - as well as some GPs now able to take some well-deserved annual leave!

If you are looking for an exciting opportunity to work as a locum GP and wanting more information in relation to locum work and travel, please get in touch with our experienced Recruitment Consultants now. We are here to help!

Below are the first stages each state has regulated for the easing of travel restrictions, with the majority starting from the 1st of June 2020.

The Queensland (QLD) changes to travel

Queensland’s Roadmap to easing COVID-19 travel restrictions started from midday on Monday the 1st of June. The roadmap has a three-step stage with the first stage allowing Queenslanders to travel anywhere in Queensland for any purpose except for restricted/remote areas. Any person who is a resident of Queensland but works in New South Wales, South Australia or the Northern Territory or who travels outside of Queensland will be permitted to cross the boarder but still must apply for an entry pass back into QLD.

Please refer to https://www.datsip.qld.gov.au/resources/datsima/covid/remote-communities-roadmap.pdf to find out which areas are still restricted. These restrictions and stage 2 will be reviewed again on the 12th of June.

The New South Wales (NSW) changes to travel

New South Wales easing of restrictions also started on the 1st of June including residents and interstate travellers being able to travel anywhere in NSW and crossing the border to or from other states depending on the other state’s restrictions. If travelling from interstate you still must follow the rules of your home state or territory when returning.

Please refer to https://www.nsw.gov.au/covid-19/travel-and-transport-advice if wishing to learn more.

The Victorian (VIC) changes to travel

Victoria’s easing of restrictions started on the 1st of June and will be reassessed on the 22nd of June. Just like NSW there are no restrictions on where you can travel in Victoria and no restrictions on leaving or entering Victoria from interstate. It is advised that you consider the restrictions that apply for the destination you are wanting to travel to if travelling interstate.

Please refer to https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/travel-restrictions-covid-19 if wishing to learn more.

The South Australian (SA) changes to travel

The second stage of eased restrictions was due to begin on the 8th of June in South Australia but has been brought forward. There are no restrictions on travel within South Australia starting from the 20th of May. Interstate travel is still being reviewed however at the moment border control check points and self-quarantine will be required when entering South Australia. Persons who are requested by the Chief Executive of the Department for Health and Wellbeing, or by the Secretary of the Commonwealth Department of Health, to assist in the provision of health services in South Australia will be exempt from these restrictions however will need to prove evidence of this.

Please refer to https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/restrictions-and-responsibilities/travel-restrictions

The Western Australian (WA) changes to travel

From Friday the 29th of May regional travel throughout most of WA is now permitted, except entry into the Kimberley region, biosecurity zones and remote Aboriginal communities. There are some exemptions to travel to these areas - such as travelling to work - where an entry pass will be required and must be submitted 3 days prior to travelling to this location. This is the same for interstate travellers such as persons for health services which will need to be approved by the Chief Executive of the Department for Health and Wellbeing, or by the Secretary of the Commonwealth Department of Health.

Please refer to https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/department-of-the-premier-and-cabinet/covid-19-coronavirus-regional-travel-restrictions and https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/AboutMainRoads/News/Pages/COVID-19.aspx for more information.

The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) changes to travel

ACT borders have never been closed with essential travel being recommended.  Although the ACT doesn’t have any border restrictions, once you leave the ACT, you will be subject to any border rules of the state you are entering. For interstate travellers coming to the ACT you must check with your own state or territory for more information and follow the current Public Health Emergency Directions in the ACT.

Please refer to https://www.covid19.act.gov.au/help-and-advice/travellers for more information.

The Northern Territory (NT) changes to travel

There are still strict border controls in place for all arrivals, including if you are returning to the NT. Only Essential travel is recommended. Interstate arrivals, including if you are returning home, are required by law to enter mandatory monitored quarantine for 14 days. Persons for health services must apply for an exemption pass and it must be approved by the Chief Health Officer. From June 15th quarantine will still be mandatory but self-quarantine will be permitted with travel restrictions still remaining the same.

The Tasmanian (TAS) changes to travel

Effective from 3pm Friday 5th of June 2020, Tasmanians will be able to travel across the state with no restrictions. However, leaving or entering Tasmania for interstate travellers still remains the same. Essential Travellers that meet strict criteria, and eligible maritime crew, will be exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement but must still comply with listed quarantine conditions directed by the Director of Public Health (https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0039/89949/77.-EMA-Directions-in-Relation-to-Arrivals-in-Tasmania-1.pdf). These restrictions will be reviewed by mid to late June.

Please refer to https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/travellers-and-visitors/essential-travellers for more information.

If you have any questions, or would like more information, please contact us.

 

 

At Medical Recruitment, we’ve been specialising in GP recruitment for a long time, so we have expert knowledge in the space. If you’re looking for an exciting opportunity to work as a permanent or locum GP job or even for a GP role after hours, then look no further - get in touch with our Recruitment Consultants now.